The Sonic Shock 4 Alarm

 

Sonic Shock 4 attaches to any kind

of high value office, classroom,

or lab equipment. 

 

If someone steals it, someone

hears it.

 

It is so loud, it hurts!

 

 

The Sonic Shock’s siren is triggered by cutting or unplugging a 10 foot electronically-monitored tether.  There’s no motion trigger, so there are no false alarms. Once tripped, the siren sounds for more than two hours.  Created especially for commercial and institutional use, the Sonic Shock is simple, reliable, and tough.  Its case is made with 1/16th inch stainless steel. Its battery will probably outlast your equipment. It is reusable. Its lock cores can be replaced. And it is impervious to the false alarms that plague so many other equipment alarms, including the Wobbler and Sonic Pro.

This clever, reliable and affordable theft deterrent has recently been a proven asset in protecting valuable (and easily stolen) digital projectors.  On a desk, a cart or a ceiling mount, the Sonic Shock makes it very hard for these things to get out the door un-noticed.

It can be a proven part of a theft prevention program.

How It Works


 


 
Features
 
bullet 120db siren - For each piece of equipment your thieves try to take, they have to take one of these. It's the worlds loudest micro alarm. You don't just hear it, you feel it.
bullet 50 Year Battery
This is not a typo. Our tiny custom analog computer sips so little current, it will take 50 years to drain the battery. No remembering to change batteries. No annoying low battery beeps. Batteries do get old, so we suggest you change it - a simple 9 volt alkaline - every 4 or 5 years or if the alarm has gone off for over an hour. But the world won't end if you forget to change the battery.
bullet Electronic Triggering
Forget the false alarms that plague most equipment alarms. You rope our ten foot (three meter) electronic tether around something heavy, plug it into the Sonic Shock, then arm it with a key. You can bump, lift, or even move equipment within the radius of the tether and never get an alarm. Unplug or cut the trip wire, and you will. Once started, it doesn't stop until you stop it.
bullet Stainless Steel
Our housings and parts are forged from granite-hard top-grade stainless steel. Stainless isn't used in public places just because it looks nice. It's extremely hard to dent, drill, and bend.
bullet The World's Strongest Glue
It's expensive, so nobody else uses it. It's the best, so we provide it with each alarm. It is called methylmethacrylate and is used industrially for car bumpers and yacht hulls - things that absolutely positively must never come apart.
bullet Installs in Minutes
Actually it only takes a minute. The other minutes you spend reading a comic book while the glue sets. If you can do that, you can do this. Just glue on the mounting bracket, snap on the alarm, plug in the electronic tether, and you're done. It'll take you longer to read our instructions.

 

Our Security Solutions


 

 

SECURITY CARTS

Chromebook Carts

iPad Carts

Tablet Carts (w/universal hubs)

Network-Ready Managed Carts

Netbook Carts

Chart of Sizes

 

CABINETS
Notebook & Netbooks

Notebook Wall Safe

APPLE EQUIPMENT

iPads and iPad minis

iPods and iPhones
Sync and Charge Strategies

iPad Security Enclosure

Apple TV

Other Apple Equipment


DELL EQUIPMENT
Security for Dell Equipment

CLASSROOM & OFFICE EQUIPMENT

Survey of Solutions

Security Cables

Pads and Enclosures

Recovery Systems

Asset Tags

Netbooks

 

MULTI-BAY BATTERY CHARGERS

Complete Charging Solutions

Dell Chargers

Lenovo Chargers

 
 

 

 

 


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Tel: 201-329-7200 Fax: 201-329-7272  -  Revised: Thursday, March 19, 2015